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TUTORIAL 0: Questions and Answers (beta 0.6)
 


 

Q. Will you be making a design tutorial?
A. I hope to some time in the near future, just outlining a few basics about graphics and design.

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Q. Will you be making a CGing tutorial?
A. Yes. Currently I'm working on an airbrush tut, but I might make one on anime cel style later. Should be up soon.

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Q. What happened to the previous scanning tutorials?
A. They were replace with newer, better ones! I thought it was time for an update, since the example pic I used wasn't really typical of my work plus the actual written content was getting a little old and needed refreshing. The old ones can be found: HERE.

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Q. How do I draw [.....]?
A. If there's something you're having trouble with like buildings, people, animals etc, the best thing to do is find magazines, books and reference material from the web. If you've never drawn a cat for example, I'd recommend copying out a few pictures of cats, so you get used to exactly how cats look and move, then try drawing your own cat picture based on previous doodles. The more you practice any single object, the easier it is to draw it again next time.

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Q. I simply CAN'T draw! What can I do?
A. Drawing at a high standard takes a lot of time, patience and hard work. I know right now you want to be able to go away, stick a pencil to paper and create a master piece, but unfortuanetly it's not that easy. If you're really dedicated and determined to be good, try practising every day. Vary what you draw so you don't get bored. Draw from life. Don't be scared to draw something, even if you think it'll turn out bad - A lot of the time pictures only turn out bad if there wasn't enough though behind what you wanted to achieve in the first place. I'd advise keeping all your old work, so after a year or two, you can look back at it and see how far you've come.

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Q. Are there any good books that teach how to draw?
A. There are many good and not so good books avaliable. If you're interested in learning to draw manga and anime style, there's plenty of "How to Draw Manga" books about to get you started. Of course I'll recommend "The Art of Drawing Manga by Ben Krefta"! Seriously tho, it's a good quality production printed on decent paper and in full colour. Plus I imagine since you're reading this, you're probably a fan of my work anyway, so go get it! It's worth getting a life drawing/ anatomy book or two; names such as "Bridgman" and "Hogarth" are known to be the best. Remember practice is a much better way to improve rather than reading how a pro does it.

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Q. How long should I spend on a picture?
A. It varies depending on the size, detail and your general drawing speed. Don't be scared to work on a drawing for more than an hour. If you want to progress, take time to make sure everything looks real, if you're adding a background, don't rush it. The longest I've ever spent on a pencil drawing has been a good 20 hours solid. If you're doing manga or comic sequential pages, but prepared to spend anything from 3 - 12 hours pencilling alone. Be patient with your picture. If you're getting sick of drawing, leave it for a while and come back later.

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Q. Where should I start when drawing people?
A. Almost always with the eyes - since they're the center of the face, it's a good starting block to build around. Then I'll draw the other facial features, followed buy the head, then go from there, usually working my way down. I like to draw out roughs for my work too, then retrace them via light box, so as far as that's concerned I'll draw the whole outline to begin with, but again, then start building up detail from the eyes. Sometimes I like to very lightlydraw a round circle for the head as my starting point and it's always a good idea to draw in masses very lightly and sketchy just to experiment with the shape and when you're happy with the lightly skeched lines, go over them a little harder.

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Q. What makes a good portfolio?
A. It depends on exactly why you're making a portfolio. It might be to submit to a comic book studios, for a client presentation, job interview or college interview. Let's say it's for a college interview. First you need to decide which course you wish to apply for. If you're a fan of drawing anime, comics and cartoons DON'T go for a Fine Art course. I've heard many people say how their tutors gave them bad grades for drawing comic characters etc. Fine art is figure drawing, landscape painting and expressionism and depending on your tutors, they don't want to see anything else. Instead, I'd check out illustration, graphic design or animation colleges, since manga and comics are simply a style of illustration. There are also colleges which specialise in comic art or video game design, but generally they'll all have one thing in common; they want to see variety and that you can adapt. Show your general strengths with life drawing and traditional media, but also have a few pieces which you are proud of. A Key element is figure drawing, so show you know anatomy and how the body works. Personally I'd have 50-70% anime or comic style work in my portfolio just so the college know what I do and what I'm interested in. Good colleges should let you explore any art field you want as long as you're dedicated and can produce the goods.

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Q. What paper should I use?
A. Everyone has their own preferences on paper. Professional comic book artists tend to use Bristol board, but as long as it doesn't crumble or tere when you draw on it, it wont make a huge difference. I tend to think thicker paper is best- I use 160 gram A4 (so it fits in my scanner) high quality printer paper a lot of the time. It's almost like card! Good things are: It's very white compared to some types of cartidge / 'special' drawing paper, it's smooth and great for drawing onto with pencil or ink, it doesn't wrinkle like thin paper plus it's relitively cheap!

 

   
 
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